Pokémon GO Is About To Stop Supporting These Smart Devices In August Patch

All good things must come to an end, and Pokémon GO continues to evolve over the years — and that means certain phones are getting left behind. In the upcoming August update to the popular Pokémon-themed Augmented Reality game, Pokémon GO will stop supporting 32-bit Android devices. That covers a lot of devices, so let’s discuss how you can check if your Android device is 32-bit or 64-bit.

iOS users will not be affected by this update, and any iOS device above the iOS 5S or iOS 10 will continue to be supported. So, why this new change to how Pokemon GO works? Niantic, the developers, state that they’re doing it to streamline future development for Pokémon GO. It just sucks that they’re leaving some people behind. If you haven’t purchased a new android phone in the last five years, you may need to update or you’ll lose access to your account. Find a full list of supported devices here.


More Pokémon GO guides:

All The Shadow Pokémon You Can Catch (So Far!) | Full List | How To Catch (And Purify) Shadow Pokémon | Capture Guide | How To Fight Team Rocket GO | Invasion Event Guide | How To Fight Rocket Leader Giovanni | Legendary Shadow Pokémon Guide | How The Buddy System Works | How To Earn Buddy Hearts Easily | How To Catch New Unova Pokémon | Trade Evolutions Guide | How To Trade & Evolutions List


Discontinued Support For Android Devices

As of the August, 2020 update for Pokémon GO, 32-bit Android smart devices will no longer be supported. These devices will be unable to make in-app purchases, or login.

Niantic Support lists some examples of phones that will be affected by this change:

  • Samsung Galaxy S4, S5, Note 3, J2, J3
  • Sony Xperia Z2, Z3
  • Motorola Moto G (1st gen), Nexus 6
  • LG Fortune, Tribute
  • OnePlus One
  • HTC One (M8)
  • ZTE Overture 3

If you’re unsure if your phone is a 32-bit device or 64-bit device, Niantic Support offers a few ideas to help you check — most Android phones before 2015 are 32-bit, and any Android phone with less than 4GB of RAM are likely 32-bit phones. Check your manufacturer for more details.

If you’re planning on upgraded, you’ll have until August before support cuts off. Make sure to save your account info, your e-mail address, login credentials, and password so you can keep access to the same account. Losing your progress sucks, so I’m hoping this change won’t hurt too many of you out there.