DMC – xbox360

8.9

Devil May Cry returns under the development of Enslaved and Heavenly Sword developers Ninja Theory, who’ve sought to reimagine Dante as a much younger guy with black, instead of white hair. Like the previous Devil May Cry games, DmC arms Dante with a sword and a pair of guns which he can use to perform a wide variety of combo attacks.
GenreAction Adventure
Platforms
xbox360


DEVELOPER Ninja Theory | PUBLISHER Codemasters | RELEASE DATE


DMC Reviews xbox360


8.9

giantbomb.com review
I brought no personal baggage to Ninja Theory’s take on Devil May Cry, having played and enjoyed the original game way back when but then steering clear of the series after its poorly received second entry. Whether you’re a longtime fan (with an open mind) or a total newcomer just looking for a solid character action game, it’s hard to imagine anyone feeling overly dissatisfied with this new game. It’s almost wholly successful at what it tries to do, and seems like the start of a promising new direction for what was otherwise a nearly forgotten franchise.
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8.9

telegraph.co.uk review
t’s okay to be disappointed that DmC isn’t an update of the fantastic Devil May Cry 3 system. It’s alright to miss the old Dante, because let’s face it, he was a bit of a dude (it’s probably less okay to miss Nero, though). I miss past Dante too, and it’d be ideal if both series continued simultaneously. That said, as DmC progresses, it becomes clear that it is a phenomenal action game in its own right, with an interesting alternate take on the fiction and a sublime handle on action gaming. A title that taps into the kind of action the likes of Platinum Games are known for. Ninja Theory has shown they know how to weave superb action, biting dialogue and a brilliant visual style into a wonderful, cohesive whole. A blistering start to 2013.
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8.9

egmnow.com review
No Synopsis Available
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8.9

gamecritics.com review
The slightly disappointing storyline aside, it’s impressive just how well the whole thing gels together, and DmC: Devil May Cry succeeds on pretty much every level imaginable. All the expected series elements are present, it looks great, it sounds great, it’s extremely well-paced, and offers a ton of content and replayability despite a slightly-short running time. In spite of the naysayers, Ninja Theory has come through to deliver one of the very best hack-and-slash games to hit the market in a very long time, and if that’s not a heartwarming tale of triumph in the face of adversity, I don’t know what is.
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8.9

joystiq.com review
Dante, a Nephilim (the product of an angel and demon’s unholy union), is humankind’s only chance at freedom from demonic enslavement, since he has the ability to enter Limbo and to use abilities from both sides of Heaven’s and Hell’s armies. Dante discovers his past and uncovers new abilities gradually throughout the game. He starts with a sword, Rebellion, but by the end of the campaign has an arsenal of projectiles, grappling whips, melee weapons and guns to rival a military-grade Ikea, and he is forced to become proficient with all of them.
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8.9

insidegamingdaily.com review
As another Japanese property handled by a Western studio, DmC: Devil May Cry easily belongs in the positive end of the spectrum, somewhere between Castlevania: Lords of Shadow and the Metroid Prime trilogy. The familiarity of the controls in combat help in welcoming DmC‘s distinctive art direction and new look for Dante. The attention paid to the script and narrative manages to make these intermissions worth watching, and not because of over-the-top gunplay or sword work; that’s for you to control in-game. Whether you’re new to the franchise or a long time fan with reservations, Ninja Theory’s DmC is worth the attention as much as the original game was over ten years ago.
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8.9

x360magazine.com review
So there’s the problem. It’s the name. The game itself is categorically excellent and even if it isn’t quite what you might expect from something labeled Devil May Cry, this is a robust, deep and brilliantly executed action game, not to mention a sterling effort at reinventing something that was – if DMC4 was anything to go by – beginning to grow stale. So it’s just the name that’s the issue, then? Heh. Maybe we aren’t such shitty shrinks after all.
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8.9

gamestm.co.uk review
There were understandable concerns that the lethargic response times that plagued combat in Heavenly Sword and Enslaved, or the simple enemies that could be cleared out with prolonged button-bashing, would carry over to this. Not so. This is a Devil May Cry game through and through and while there are Ninja Theory flourishes, such as a cinematic slo-mo angle for the final kill, there’s nothing here that ever interferes with the core combat.
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8.9

ztgd.com review
DmC is the first major release of 2013, and if it sets the tone, I am excited for the rest of the year. This is easily the best reboot I have played in ages, along with being one of the best action games in recent memory. Ninja Theory has really nailed what makes these kinds of games fun, while at the same time crafting a coherent story in the DmC universe. Sure, the combat can be argued all day long by purists of the series, but if that is your hang up, you are denying yourself an amazing game to play. Fans of the genre, series and games in general definitely need to see what Ninja Theory has achieved here. It’s easily an early contender for my favorite games of the year.

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8.9

gameinformer.com review
The last few missions aside, the mechanics, gameplay, and environments in Devil May Cry are exactly what I wanted. A reboot is a chance to revitalize a flagging series, and Ninja Theory has done that with a striking vision for the DMC universe and top-notch combat. Maybe this version of Devil May Cry will need rebooting in another 12 years, but for now, I can’t wait to see what’s next for Dante.
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8.9

eurogamer.it review
No Synopsis Available
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8.9

destructoid.com review
You can argue DmC’s merits as a Devil May Cry entry all the live long day. You can bicker over whether or not it deserves the share a name with the series’ frankly spotty past. This, however, is not an argument I choose to indulge, because the bottom line is that DmC: Devil May Cry is a beautiful, bold, and supremely enjoyable videogame in its own right. It deserves to be praised.
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8.9

hardcoregamer.com review
Ninja Theory has not only managed to match the level of excellence achieved in the Devil May Cry series, but exceed it with the visually arresting and exhilarating DmC: Devil May Cry. Every element is perfectly in place with dynamic gameplay, inspiring level design, a fantastic Noisia/Combichrist soundtrack and an over the top modern tone that wholly compliments the series. Combine all that with a 15-20 hour campaign full of an emotionally resonant (and often outlandish) story, and all but the most jaded gamers will walk away satisfied.
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8.9

consolemonster.com review
Devil May Cry still has its flaws and are readily visible in the game; the camera angles can be frustrating at times, for instance when Dante jumps off a wall in mid-air he will miss the platform that he was meant to land on and fall down. If you over jump a platform you will just fall off and lose a small portion of your health. The soundtrack is really upbeat throughout the game with hard rock but can soon get rather annoying.
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8.9

multiplayer.it review
No Synopsis Available
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8.9

meristation.com review
No Synopsis Available
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8.9

3djuegos.com review
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8.9

4players.de review
No Synopsis Available
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8.9

vandal.net review
No Synopsis Available
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8.9

gamereactor.se review
No Synopsis Available
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