Halo: Reach – xbox360

9.4

Halo: Reach, is a prequel to Halo: Combat Evolved, taking place during Halo: The Fall of Reach and the beginning of Halo: First Strike when there are many Spartan-IIs still in action, though it is currently unknown how closely it will tie into the novels.
GenreFirst-Person Shooters
Platforms
xbox360


DEVELOPER Bungie Software | PUBLISHER Codemasters | RELEASE DATE


Halo: Reach Reviews xbox360


9.4

planetxbox360.com review
Between the much more interesting story, devoid of the uninteresting Flood element, and the eternal multiplayer, I can see myself returning to this game over and over again.
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9.4

co-optimus.com review
The Co-Op Experience: Team up in four player co-op through the campaign or in Firefight. Players can mix and match offline split screen with online and utilize match making to fill in the rest.
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9.4

destructoid.com review
Halo: Reach is everything a Halo fan has ever dreamed for. All that was lacking from previous Halo games is here and then some. This is Bungie’s love letter to their fans and they’ve definitely gone out with a bang.
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9.4

telegraph.co.uk review
Bungie wouldn’t have it any other way. Halo is their story, and with Reach you feel they have just closed the book. It may not have the lasting impact of Combat Evolved, but as a refinement of the idea –the essence– of Halo, it is their finest work yet.
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9.4

g4tv.com review
You almost need to look at Halo: Reach as two games, with one being the campaign you can tackle solo, or with up to three friends, and the other game as the multiplayer experience that has been pumped up with plenty of new opportunities for death.
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9.4

joystiq.com review
There’s an art to iteration. ODST could have been a clever little shimmy, but it came out a misstep. Reach brings us right back into the dance that hooked us nine years ago, introduces some cool new steps, and leaves us twirling in enchantment as Bungie graciously bows out.
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9.4

gamepro.com review
Expertly paced storytelling and carefully crafted gameplay, all wrapped neatly in Spartan armor, delivers the best Halo campaign to date. Multiplayer fans get even more bang for their buck with Reach’s bottomless suite of online options.
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9.4

1up.com review
After seeing the perfect last shot of the campaign (in fact, it’s so spot-on, that Bungie community director Brian Jarrard confirms that, unlike previous titles, there’s no additional cinematic or end-scene for finishing on Legendary difficulty — everyone sees the same last scene), and playing round after round of multiplayer, I can say that while I admire and respect every previous Halo title, Reach is the Halo that I absolutely love.
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9.4

gamingbolt.com review
“In my beginning is my end… In my end is my beginning.” Reach takes us back to the beginning of the Halo franchise and marks Bungie’s beautiful Swan song to the epic FPS series with exciting multiplayer, the intense Firefight mode and the best campaign yet
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9.4

thunderboltgames.com review
Reach is the most spectacularly euphoric hello and goodbye in gaming history. Just as Halo 2’s single player was criticized for being a means to an end, Halo: Reach should be lauded for being an end to a means. It is an encore and a lap of honour for the most iconic trilogy of the past decade, complementing rather than trying to outdo its forbearers. Every aspect of Reach pays homage to the ‘Best of’ Halo, but successfully refreshes them to feel integral to the experience. With Reach, Bungie have encompassed every strength of every department to deliver their defining end product; a hello to some, a goodbye to many but a thank you to all.
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9.4

oxm.co.uk review
Halo 2’s rushed development of (or its crushingly disappointing ending) far from Halo 3’s convoluted story that needed to retread familiar ground to resonate with players, and far from the greatest hits package that ODST’s missions erred towards, stands Halo: Reach. Bungie has finally got the ingredients just right. It has taken one stripped-down step back to make the FPS giant take two massive
leaps forward, but it’s worth it. Reach may fall, but its memory will remain for some time to come.
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9.4

gamereactor.se review
No Synopsis Available
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9.4

gamereactor.dk review
No Synopsis Available
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9.4

totalvideogames.com review
Invasion is certainly a welcome change of pace to Halo’s traditional fare of skull games, capture the flag, Slayer, Swat and alike. Pitting the Covenant against Spartans in the mode has also allowed Bungie to try out some neat ideas with the Armour Abilities, such as an evasive roll manoeuvre unique to the Covenant Elites. These abilities, which include the now famous jetpack, a Predator-esque invisibility cloak, and an enemy-duping holographic version of your character, all seem to be fairly well balanced throughout the multiplayer at large and definitely add to the single-player experience as well. Our particular favourite is the hologram for its originality and how stupid it can make enemies look, but each Armour Ability has its benefits to be honest. It really depends on your style more than anything else.
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9.4

msxbox-world.com review
Halo: Reach is without doubt Bungie’s finest Halo game, and best of all it has the story and structure to the campaign to finally deliver the Halo experience that some of us have been waiting for since the original Halo: Combat Evolved launched on Xbox back in 2002.
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9.4

ztgamedomain.com review
No Synopsis Available
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9.4

totallygn.com review
Another new addition is your Psych Profile. This is where you customize the type of people that the Halo matchmaking service will find. You can pick from how chatty someone is, what a person’s motivation is, how they view teamwork and their tone in the match whether they are “polite” or “rowdy”. You can also restrict the searches that the game will make such as only finding people with good connections, whether you want to look for gamers that speak your specific language and whether you want the service to prioritize similarly skilled players. The system is pretty in depth and Bungie did a remarkable job at allowing people to tailor the experience they want to get out of the game.

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9.4

meristation.com review
No Synopsis Available
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9.4

http://xbox360.gamespy.com/xbox-360/halo-project/1120289p1.html review
Some new game types spice things up quite a bit, too. Invasion — which might be my new favorite Halo multiplayer mode — is a multi-tiered objective game that requires you to capture or defend a few points before ultimately extracting a power core. This type of game isn’t groundbreaking by any means, but Bungie’s added a delicious little twist by amping up the loadouts with each successive tier. This means that, by the end of the game, nearly everyone’s wielding a shotgun or plasma sword or grenade launcher, and flying around with jetpacks or driving tanks. In layman’s terms, it’s a complete and utter sh*tshow… and I love it.
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9.4

escapistmagazine.com review
And you will have to play it smart. In the absence of the mindless, infectious Flood, your only enemies are the various races of the Covenant as we haven’t seen them since the first Halo: brutal and intimidating. The silly little chatter of the Grunts is replaced by incomprehensible alien babble, and they certainly don’t seem as much like comic relief when they’re charging you with two lit plasma grenades in hand. The Elites charge and flank with deadly efficiency, and the Brutes are just as vicious as they’ve ever been.

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9.4

gameblog.fr review
No Synopsis Available
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9.4

guardian.co.uk review
Halo: Reach, simply, is Bungie’s masterwork, and if you own an Xbox 360, you’d be an idiot not to buy a copy – even if you’re not a fan of first-person shooters, it will still make you marvel at just how good a game can look and feel. And it throws down a massive gauntlet as part of what will be an intriguing sub-text this Christmas: will it be the game everyone is playing on Xbox Live, or will Call of Duty: Black Ops have the quality to usurp it online?
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9.4

play.tm review
No Synopsis Available
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9.4

ign.com review
Halo: Reach is a fantastic package, with several core components that on their own can outclass many other games. The campaign is excellent, backed by solid storytelling and a powerful audio-visual experience. The competitive multiplayer is familiar, yet brand new with a lot more options and a faster pacing.
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9.4

vandal.net review
No Synopsis Available
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9.4

multiplayer.it review
No Synopsis Available
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9.4

nowgamer.com review
We thought Reach would be something special, as it’s Bungie’s last Halo title. What we weren’t expecting was a game that had quite so much heart, a near-perfect gameplay balance and the clear culmination of all its work and promises over the years. Reach is simply stunning and the perfect end to the 360’s flagship series.
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9.4

gametrailers.com review
No Synopsis Available
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9.4

computerandvideogames.com review
A beautiful, astoundingly deep – yet very familiar – Halo package. Thanks for the memories, Bungie…
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9.4

videogamer.com review
Anyone following the Halo series for the last decade couldn’t ask for a better game, as Bungie has exited its most precious series with one almighty, planet-shattering bang.
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9.4

eurogamer.net review
Reach is an encore, a victory lap, a crowd-pleasing last hurrah for a series that most definitely won’t end here, but will just as definitely never be the same again. Halo deserves another game this good, and Reach is a deserving tribute.
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9.4

gamezone.com review
It goes without saying that Bungie’s devotion and investment has paid off, exponentially. With Halo: Reach, Bungie has gone above and beyond expectations and delivered the standout title of the year that caps off Bungie’s nine-year journey that began on the original Xbox with Halo: Combat Evolved. Halo: Reach is 2010’s multiplayer title of the year.
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9.4

gamesradar.com review
Do you buy Halo mostly for the multiplayer? Then Reach is everything you’d want and expect from Bungie’s final contribution to the franchise – perfectly polished familiarity with exactly the right amount of fresh features and bold risk-taking.
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9.4

giantbomb.com review
Halo: Reach feels like a wholly appropriate stopping point for the series, filling out some more of the relevant fiction that surrounds the core trilogy while building the multiplayer out in such a way that Halo fans will have something to play until whatever’s next is ready for release.
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9.4

avclub.com review
The original Halo was a small, humble game that featured strong, indelible characters. The game’s blessing and curse is that its ongoing success is inextricably tied to the success of its multiplayer action. And multiplayer does impress in Reach. New modes like Headhunter, Stockpile, and Invasion, alongside series staples like Firefight, are in full effect. Invasion, in particular, with its multiple objectives and team-based play, is an absolute standout, and a must-play for any multiplayer fiend. Better still, the game’s matchmaking ability is eerily intuitive. You’re rarely dropped into a match where you can’t handle yourself. But many thousands of people are playing online at this very moment. That high-fiving, frat-house, epithet-spewing, tea-bagging culture has had the unfortunate side-effect of making the Halo universe increasingly less soulful, rendering the subtitle of the original game—“Combat evolved”—something of an oxymoron.
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9.4

gameshark.com review
The less said about the multiplayer community, the better. Don’t sprain anything reaching for the mute button. As you play Halo: Reach, you’re supposed to get a sense of character progression from a bunch of self-contained achievements and weekly challenges and bonus points and slot machine credits that all funnel into a pointless ranking system and a bundle of spacebucks you can spend to unlock some of the most inconsequential shreds and patches since Bethesda tried to sell you armor for your horse. Am I honestly supposed to care what kind of wrist guards my Master Chief look-a-like wears? While that’s a rhetorical question, Bungie’s answer is an emphatic “Yes!”
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