Demon’s Souls – ps3

9.1

King Allant the XII, the last king of Boletaria, searched tirelessly to expand his might. The Nexus, a great ice shrine nestled in the mountains, bestowed the power of the souls onto him, bringing prosperity to his kingdom. Still unsated, he returned again to the Nexus, where he foolishly awakened the Old One from its eternal slumber. This long forgotten evil, now wrought upon Boletaria, plunged the realm into darkness and fog. A mighty demon horde poured into the kingdom, devouring the souls of men.
GenreRole-Playing
Platforms
ps3


DEVELOPER FromSoftware | PUBLISHER Codemasters | RELEASE DATE


Demon’s Souls Reviews ps3


9.1

gamestm.co.uk review
Such online interactions are ultimately what turn the Demon’s Souls experience from a cruel one to something much more fun and rewarding. Its extreme difficulty and wealth of cleverly hidden secrets encourage the generous community of role-players to work together, and not just in the obvious ways. A loyal and friendly fanbase has emerged on the net that will help both new and veteran players to make sense of the game’s insanely deep world rules and the strategies that go with them, while From Software itself has contributed with the truly inspired messaging system.
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9.1

acegamez.co.uk review
No Synopsis Available
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9.1

telegraph.co.uk review
And so you raise your shield, pushing forward inch by inch. There’s a shriek, a smashing of wood, and a Dregling – a humanoid creature twisted by the insanity that grips the kingdom of Boletaria (the land in which the game is set) – begins to lunge. You’ve seen the phantoms. You’ve heeded the warnings. It’s clear that direct damage could be fatal. The enemy swings. Blocked. Roll. He’s left reeling, wide open. You dive in, swing your sword, land the killing blow. The Dregling falls. Your soul count increases.
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9.1

eurogamer.es review
No Synopsis Available
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9.1

1up.com review
Again, it’s infuriating, and certainly worth a few verbal curses, but your screw-ups and subsequent deaths start to become hilarious, and that’s why it’s easy to go right back at it within seconds. On the whole, it’s an extra-careful game of chicken, but there are benefits to taking a break and returning to the hub world of the Nexus, especially after you have a lot of Souls to spend and/or completed a certain milestone that permanently affects an area, like opening a big gate or defeating a boss. It’s a nonstop learning experience in knowing how you can go back, when you can go back, and if you can go back.
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9.1

.gamerstemple.com review
Your goal in Demon’s Souls is to clear out various locales in Boletaria while collecting the souls of fallen enemies, which can, in turn, be used as currency for purchasing new weapons, repairing old ones and upgrading your characters stats. You’ll need to do all three if you expect to battle through to the game’s bosses, all of which are brutally powerful and remorseless about killing you. Over and over. Here’s where it gets tough; if you die, you lose ALL the souls you have acquired, all the enemies you’ve bested respawn and restoring yourself to the world of the living requires either beating a boss or using one very hard to find and extremely valuable item. See, after you die, you can continue adventuring in spirit form, where you have less HP and slightly more powerful attacks, but your goal becomes regaining your body – another headache to add to the already substantial list of tasks before you. And dying is always a very real possibility; even the lowliest of enemies can kill you with only one or two hits. Even worse, if you keep dying, your enemies actually grow stronger and get more deadly. Yikes.

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9.1

impulsegamer.com review
The AI is the game can be quite challenging at times and although you face your stock standard monster grunts, the bosses in the game can really kick your ass to hell and black. If you do die, you will transported back to the nexus, a world between worlds where you can meet others, trade and teleport to other areas in the game. Needless to say, I visited this place way too often but Demon’s Souls is like an evil supermodel lover, you cannot resist her!
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9.1

totalplaystation.com review
That is the appeal of Demon’s Souls, that "a ha!" moment where it all clicks, where all the deaths and frustrations and cries of "fuck this game, I’m never playing it again" come rushing back. They were all lessons, all ways to illustrate that the only thing separating you from mowing through every enemy that presents itself, every former one-hit kill, is just simple knowledge and experience. This is a game that teaches by the heavy-handed means of pure, unflinching punishment, and as you’ll quickly re-learn when proceeding to the next area, the second you forget those core tenets of patience, awareness and care, the game will happily and unceremoniously end your life and send you back to the start of the level.
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9.1

gamecritics.com review
Forget everything you may have heard about the game being incredibly difficult or unforgiving. Categorizing Demon’s Souls with such a narrow view and leaving it at that does the title an incredible injustice. What it actually does is submerge players deeply in its world and asks them to understand its reality. Every aspect of its identity is tied to a clear central vision. By crafting an absolutely logical, holistic world and going to great lengths to make it cohere in every way, the result is an experience unlike any other.
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9.1

gamingexcellence.com review
But in the end, when you see the death knight collapse to your blows, when you see the giant behemoth finally fall after a fifteen minute battle, when you see the rest of the level open up before you, there will be a feeling of satisfaction so strong that you will have no choice but you move further, shield, wand, or sword ready, into the darkness.
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9.1

gamernode.com review
Leveling a character is immensely important in this oppressive game world, so players may find themselves doing a bit of grinding to earn more souls on more than one occasion. Although an initial character class must be chosen from a list of 10 at the journey’s outset, only by trading souls for stat boosts will a character truly develop into a specialized warrior. Just because a character begins as a knight doesn’t mean he or she can’t ultimately become a powerful magician or priest, and vice-versa. Likewise, a huge list of weapons and armor can be upgraded using souls and ores in a myriad of ways, including many special weapons with powerful effects, each tailored to a different type of character. Two separate (and UNequal) blacksmiths offer different upgrades, making the depth of this tiered upgrade system quite incredible and offering new goals for which players will strive throughout the game.
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9.1

gameplanet.co.nz review
For a while there it almost looked as though this game wouldn’t make it to our shores, despite universal acclaim and a remarkable number of ‘Game of the Year’ awards bestowed on it by gaming media. For once, however, PAL gamers have a chance to rejoice, as packaged within the local version is a hardback artbook with soundtrack CD and an exclusive strategy guide which was not available in other territories. This strategy guide has been written and contributed to by fans of the game from all over the world, and is thoroughly accurate and helpful.
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9.1

gamerlimit.com review
Dying is also incredibly easy to do: if you’re not careful, you could fall off a cliff, spring an enemy trap, or get caught in crossfire. In fact, very rarely will you be happy with the first character you make. By the time you’re a few hours through your first playthrough, you immediately might want to restart your game and make different choices.
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9.1

vandal.net review
No Synopsis Available
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9.1

gamefocus.ca review
Multiplayer is unique and an amazing experience in so many ways. First off you will see wandering ghosts that were actually other players who were playing their game. If you follow them or see where they came from you may see a secret or interesting area you may have missed. There is also graffiti on the ground, but this is not normal graffiti in fact these are messages left from other players that you can rate if they were accurate or helpful. Sometimes they are, but sometimes these are false and can lead you to your doom. The other nice multiplayer online aspect that you see a lot is blood stains which you can touch and see how other players died.
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9.1

nzgamer.com review
Demon’s Soul is it. It will kill you, cap your health, break your sword, make you replay the same half hour ten times over and then kill you some more. But, because of this its rewards are infinitely more exhilarating and satisfying. However, the game isn’t completely heartless. The bosses aren’t impossibly tough, because they are so hard to get to, and there are some fantastically powerful weapons to be found. It’s very deep in terms of gameplay, tactics, hidden items, and role-playing stats and mechanics. It dark, depressingly bleak in the best possible way. And it’s difficult. If you’re sick of all those week-end party games and pretty interactive picture books that have been passing themselves off as computer games, then Demon’s Souls may be the challenge you’ve been waiting for.

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9.1

tbreak.com review
No Synopsis Available
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9.1

gaming-age.com review
No Synopsis Available
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9.1

gameshark.com review
No matter how tough you think you are the messages will save your life, alerting you to an opponent’s weakness, an upcoming ambush, or the safe places to stand beneath an onslaught of arrows. Traps that can only be found through trial-and-error exist, but are very rare. Messages can also be your weakness, blinding you to the obvious. I repeated the same section for nearly four hours. I followed the message that said, “Run straight through,” and sprinted across a series of bridges while trying to evade the flames of a swooping dragon. Apparently, no one felt the need to point out the conspicuous staircase leading to a tunnel below.
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9.1

eurogamer.net review
Using a bow lets you stalk enemies in first-person from a distant turret. Find a wand, and you can cast magic; find a talisman, you can heal yourself with miracles. The closest comparison is Monster Hunter, but Demon’s Souls’ combat controls are more precise; the weapons feel realistic rather than comically extreme. Fighting is physical, violent and cathartic, and you find yourself forming genuine attachments to favourite weapons.
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